Readiness for leaving EASA – airworthiness

In September 2020, the CAA published guidance on ‘readiness for Brexit’.

The CAA guidance includes;

all current technical requirements will be retained in UK domestic regulation;

all type certificates and certificates of release to service for aeronautical products and parts issued on or before 31 December remain valid;

all other certificates, approvals and licences issued in accordance with EASA requirements that are in effect on 31 December will remain valid under UK law for two years unless they expire sooner;

the UK’s existing safety arrangements with countries beyond the EU will continue;

new CAA systems for approving aircraft parts will come into effect

EASA sailplanes, powered sailplanes including TMGs, and aeroplanes – Airworthiness Review Certificate (ARC) and maintenance

BGA airworthiness approvals are unaffected other than in due course ‘UK’ will replace ‘EASA’ in the title. In due course we will seamlessly adopt ICAO compliant UK ARCs under the retained rules. Owners will eventually see a slightly redesigned ARC document. The airworthiness and maintenance processes continue unchanged.

Buying and Selling

There is an impact on the permanent movement of aircraft in and out of the UK. Subject to any last minute changes which could occur under the Governments ongoing negotiations with the EU, aircraft including sailplanes sold to buyers from the UK to an EU country that have an ARC issued after 1 Jan 21, and aircraft imported into the UK from an EU country that have an ARC issued after 1 Jan 21, will from 1 Jan 21 be subject to an export C of A issued by the State that issued the ARC. The BGA will update its published guidance on buying and selling including details of export C of A as soon as there is a final UK Government position.

Non-EASA aircraft including non-EASA gliders

The existing airworthiness and maintenance processes continue unchanged.

EASA Sailplanes operating on a Permit to Fly

Manufacturers of new or updated sailplanes like to get their products to customers before completing what can be a lengthy final certification process. As a result, there are a number of sailplanes flying on an EASA Permit to Fly (PtF) issued under the manufacturers requirements pending certification. On expiry of any existing EASA PtF, these aircraft will need to be registered in the UK and their EASA PtF renewed as a UK Permit to Fly. CAA has advised that it will issue guidance soon.

Recognition of UK issued ARCs within the EU

Subject to any last minute changes which could occur under the Governments ongoing negotiations with the EU, from 1 Jan 21, aircraft that hold a UK issued ARC that are visiting the EU may need airworthiness validation by the authority in the country in which the aircraft is flying. As soon as the situation is clear, guidance will be provided.